Scotland and ethical finance: perspectives from experts

This video series was produced by the Global Ethical Finance Initiative (GEFI) for its Ethical Finance 2020 virtual conference.

In this series of short videos, I interview experts from academia and the financial sector for their insights on the history of ethical finance in Scotland and Scotland’s role today in driving forward this fast-growing market.

Video #1: Adam Smith and the Theory of Moral Sentiments. In this video, I interview Professor Charles Munn, economic historian. We explore Scotland’s ethical finance past and from his historical home, Panmure House, in Edinburgh we talk about Adam Smith, a famous Scot often heralded as the father of modern economics. We look at Smith’s work, his legacy and ask what would he have made of today’s coronavirus crisis.

Video #2: The Wealth of Nations. Natwest Group’s National Archive holds one of the first print editions of Adam Smith’s the Wealth of Nations published in 1776. I interview Ruth Reed, Head of Archives, Professor Charles Munn and Thom Kenrick from the Royal Bank of Scotland about the immense popularity and enduring influence of the book.

Video #3: Scotland as a leader in ethical finance. I interview Professor Charles Munm, economic historian, Andrew Cave from Bailie Gifford and Thom Kenrick, Royal Bank of Scotland on how Scotland has played a role historically on the ethical finance agenda and how it is placed today to advance responsible and sustainable finance globally. We also explore what Adam Smith would make of society today and the focus on ethical finance.

Video #4: ESG investment and the state of the market. In this video, I interview Andrew Cave of Baillie Gifford at Edinburgh’s Calton Hill on the recent rise in ESG-aligned investment and what it means for mobilising more financing for the SDGs. Andrew shares his insights on the need for more rigour in the market on how “impact” is measured, and talks about a brochure he recently authored on the history of ethical investment.

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